Ocean Warming Is Accelerating Faster Than Thought, New Research Finds – The New York Times

[The I.P.C.C. also issued a report last year that described a climate crisis as soon as 2040.]

That method was subject to uncertainties, especially around measurement depth, that hamper today’s scientists as they stitch together temperature records into a global picture.

In the new analysis, Mr. Hausfather and his colleagues assessed three recent studies that better accounted for instrument biases in the historical record. The results converged at an estimate of ocean warming that was higher than the I.P.C.C. predicted and more in line with the climate models.

The researchers also reviewed a fourth study that had used a novel method to estimate ocean temperatures over time and had also found that the world’s oceans were heating faster than the I.P.C.C. prediction. But that study contained an error that caused its authors to revise their estimates downward, suggesting that ocean warming was less of a problem than they originally reported.

As it turned out, the downward revision brought that study’s estimates much closer to the new consensus. “The correction made it agree a lot better with the other new observational records,” Mr. Hausfather said. “Previously it showed significantly more warming than anyone, and that was potentially worrisome because it meant our observational estimates might be problematic. Now their best estimate is pretty much dead-on with the other three recent studies.”

The scientists who published the four studies were not trying to make their results align, Mr. Hausfather said. “The groups who were working on ocean heat observations, they’re not climate modelers,” he said. “They’re not particularly concerned with whether or not their observations agree or disagree with climate models.”

This content was originally published here.

Yonkers man charged with assault after kicking woman, 78, in the face on Bronx subway: police | WPIX 11 New York

Yonkers man charged with assault after kicking woman, 78, in the face on Bronx subway: police

BRONX — A Yonkers man has been identified and charged with assault after he was seen in cellphone video kicking an elderly woman in the face on a subway in the Bronx, police said Saturday.

Police said Saturday that 36-year-old Marc Gomez is expected to be charged with second degree assault, third degree assault and harassment, in connection with the subway attack. Police noted the 78-year-old victim’s age played a role in the degree of the charges.

Gomez was apprehended Saturday morning in lower Manhattan after someone who knew him tipped off police from the 6th precinct of his location, authorities said.

On Sunday, March 10, at about 3:10 a.m., inside of the Nereid Avenue/ White Plains Road subway station, a man approached a 78-year-old woman  who was seated, and began to punch and kick her numerous times in her face and her body, police said.

The horrendous assault was captured on cellphone video.

The disturbing footage shows the man kicking the seated victim six times, twice in the head and four times in her upper body, before walking off the subway yelling, “Now Worldstar that!”

The woman, who was seen with several bags, tried to block the kicks with her left hand, while stunned passengers watched, the video showed.

The man left the No. 2 train at the station and fled on foot.

The woman rode the train one more northbound stop and exited at the Wakefield-241 Street /White Plains Road station, where she was met by EMS.

She suffered from bleeding and swelling with cuts to the face, police said.

She was treated on scene by EMS and refused further medical attention, according to police.

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The King and Queen of Cruelty – The New York Times

The King and Queen of Cruelty

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The Trumps preparing to greet King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia of Spain on Tuesday.CreditChip Somodevilla/Getty Images

You just can’t construct prisons for babies. You can’t rip children from mothers and fathers. You can’t use the power of the American government to institute and oversee a program of state-sponsored child abuse. You can’t have a system where the process and possibility of reunification is murky and maybe futile.

You can’t do any of that and assume that decent people won’t rise up in revolt.

Donald Trump learned that this week as an avalanche of indignation came down on him and his administration for his brutal, inhumane “zero tolerance” policy at the border, which was resulting in the terrible suffering of children and their parents.

Citizens were outraged. Politicians were outraged. Corporate leaders were outraged. Foreign leaders were outraged. The pope was outraged.

This is an immoral act of an immoral man, one who saw absolutely no flaw in using the anguish of children and families — people he viewed as deficient and less-than, “not their best” — as pawns in a political fight to force Congress to fund his ridiculous hate symbol: a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

He clearly didn’t even think that this was a losing battle for him. He thought using border agents to abduct these children was a winning idea.

On Wednesday, The Associated Press reported: “President Donald Trump sees his hard-line immigration stance as a winning issue heading into a midterm election he views as a referendum on his protectionist policies.”

A Republican member of Congress told CNN that Trump said on Tuesday during a closed-door meeting that “the crying babies doesn’t look good politically.”

Indeed, a CNN poll conducted by SSRS and released Monday found although two-thirds of Americans overall opposed the policy, a majority of Republicans supported it.

Think about that for a second. That to me goes beyond standard political tribalism. That ventures into the territory that the Tennessee Republican senator Bob Corker described last week: This is cultlike.

Trump’s grip on the throat of the Republican Party is so strong that it no longer has breath or voice for objection.

As goes Trump, so goes it.

Not even the sight of devastated families could move the party that once called itself the party of family values. Not even the idea of “tender age” internment camps for babies could move the party built on the protection of “unborn babies.”

The contradiction is abominable.

It’s not that Trump and his family don’t understand the downside of imposing even the smallest amount of stress on children. It’s just that they value different children in differing degrees.

Melania Trump clearly thought that it was too traumatic to move the couple’s young son to Washington during the school year, so she stayed with him in New York, costing taxpayers tens of millions of dollars for security.

“At that age, it’s hard to explain to them. … I tell him: Take it day by day, enjoy your life, live your meaningful life as I like to do. … Of course, at that age, every child would worry, especially if they love school, if they love friends; they don’t want to lose that. Everything is a new opportunity and it brings new friends and a new school. You never know, you never know what happens. Enjoy it day by day, live your life and don’t stress yourself.”

No, please don’t stress yourself. Stress is for poor people, like immigrants.

Even though, as The New York Times reported, sparing their son from the stress of changing schools and moving from a luxury Manhattan apartment to one of the most famous and important residences in the world cost the New York Police Department an estimated $127,000 to $146,000 a day “to protect the first lady and her son while they reside in Trump Tower.”

Melania Trump didn’t move to the White House until last June.

“A federal spending agreement reached late on Sunday will reimburse New York City for money spent securing U.S. President Donald Trump and his family at Trump Tower in Manhattan.”

Yes, she made an unusual step in publicly condemning the family separation policy, but she did so using her husband’s false “both sides of the aisle” talking point. That was a lie. The president alone started this and had the power to end it.

Then she tweeted this tone-deaf, Marie Antoinette-ish statement, as her husband was still separating children from their parents and sending them to internment camps:

“A great visit with the King & Queen of Spain at the @WhiteHouse today. Queen Letizia & I enjoyed tea & time together focusing on the ways we can positively impact children.”

Enjoyed tea? Positively impact children?

Is she or her husband going to visit the child internment camps he created, to see what they wrought and console the crying children there? Is either going to work tirelessly for the swift reunification of every single family that has been torn apart? Will either publicly apologize to the families who were damaged?

Until then, I give her no laurels. Donald and Melania are a team in this terror. They have worked together to make the abhorrent normal. They deserve each other; we deserve better.

This content was originally published here.

Government Shutdown Curtails F.D.A. Food Inspections – The New York Times

Soon after the shutdown began, the F.D.A. gave inspectors access to a central expense account so they could continue traveling while avoiding large personal credit card bills without knowing when the government would reimburse them.

The agency, part of the Department of Health and Human Services, is not dependent on federal funding for all of its activities. It receives much of its support from user fees imposed on the pharmaceutical, medical device, generic drug and other industries it regulates.

Although about 41 percent of the staff is now furloughed because the agency had not received its federal appropriations before the shutdown, those in jobs supported by user fees have remained at work. But even those departments have taken a hit, as the F.D.A. has had to shift priorities for some duties.

In the pharmaceutical section, for example, some officials who generally consider pending drug applications are now working on post-market surveillance, checking for adverse events, like unexpected side effects of drugs or other problems.

“We have a deep concern about those employees who were furloughed, their inability to fulfill their public health functions, and the tremendous personal impact that it has on them,” said Ladd Wiley, executive director of the Alliance for a Stronger F.D.A., a nonprofit advocacy group. “We are also grateful to the roughly 10,000 employees who are retained and working.”

But, Mr. Wiley added, his organization also was concerned about nonemergency functions that the F.D.A. has had to put aside. Among the important work being delayed right now, he noted, are manufacturing inspections, technical assistance and advice to the produce industry — especially guidance for preventing contamination — and activity related to food additives.

“There is a whole list of things that are not getting done,” he said.

Some public health experts were worried about the impact of the shutdown on inspection of fish. Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said he was concerned about contaminated shellfish ending up on store shelves during the shutdown.

This content was originally published here.

Government Shutdown Curtails F.D.A. Food Inspections – The New York Times

Soon after the shutdown began, the F.D.A. gave inspectors access to a central expense account so they could continue traveling while avoiding large personal credit card bills without knowing when the government would reimburse them.

The agency, part of the Department of Health and Human Services, is not dependent on federal funding for all of its activities. It receives much of its support from user fees imposed on the pharmaceutical, medical device, generic drug and other industries it regulates.

Although about 41 percent of the staff is now furloughed because the agency had not received its federal appropriations before the shutdown, those in jobs supported by user fees have remained at work. But even those departments have taken a hit, as the F.D.A. has had to shift priorities for some duties.

In the pharmaceutical section, for example, some officials who generally consider pending drug applications are now working on post-market surveillance, checking for adverse events, like unexpected side effects of drugs or other problems.

“We have a deep concern about those employees who were furloughed, their inability to fulfill their public health functions, and the tremendous personal impact that it has on them,” said Ladd Wiley, executive director of the Alliance for a Stronger F.D.A., a nonprofit advocacy group. “We are also grateful to the roughly 10,000 employees who are retained and working.”

But, Mr. Wiley added, his organization also was concerned about nonemergency functions that the F.D.A. has had to put aside. Among the important work being delayed right now, he noted, are manufacturing inspections, technical assistance and advice to the produce industry — especially guidance for preventing contamination — and activity related to food additives.

“There is a whole list of things that are not getting done,” he said.

Some public health experts were worried about the impact of the shutdown on inspection of fish. Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said he was concerned about contaminated shellfish ending up on store shelves during the shutdown.

This content was originally published here.